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The Twin City duo Stone & Snow performs their song "Love Is A Weapon" for the NPR Tiny Desk Concert.
YOUTUBE / STONE & SNOW

Stone & Snow Wins International Songwriting Contest

Karen Bridges and Clint Thomson of the Bloomington-Normal folk duo Stone & Snow are on a roll with their original song "Love is a Weapon."

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Join us for an expert panel discussion, moderated by the GLT newsroom, about youth mental health at 6 p.m. Feb. 12 at ISU's Alumni Center.

Chairs and a table inside the new Colene Hoose addition
Jeff Smudde / WGLT

Photos: Colene Hoose Addition Helps Meet Expanding Special Education Needs

Unit 5 board members joined Normal Town Council members for a tour of the new addition at Colene Hoose Elementary School on Tuesday night.

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Music Stories

The Twin City duo Stone & Snow performs their song "Love Is A Weapon" for the NPR Tiny Desk Concert.
YOUTUBE / STONE & SNOW

Karen Bridges and Clint Thomson of the Bloomington-Normal folk duo Stone & Snow are on a roll with their original song "Love is a Weapon."

Sunday Afternoon, from left: Logan Berg, Jacob Labertew, Austin Willis, Nick Saathoff, DiMari Fennell
Sunday Afternoon

Members of the Bloomington-Normal neo-eclectic band Sunday Afternoon said winning a couple Battle of the Bands confirmed their retro sound was finding an audience.

Cindy Youngren and Dan Diefendorf with Hoosier Daddy at Crusens in Peoria
TJ Dehn

Members of three established Peoria-based bands have come together as the Americana trio Hoosier Daddy.

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Today, the three Americans who helped subdue a gunman on a Paris-bound train last month were honored by President Obama in the Oval Office.

"Because of their courage, because of their quick thinking ... a real calamity was averted," Obama said, saying the trio "represent the very best of America."

The three men — Oregon National Guardsman Alek Skarlatos, Anthony Sadler, and Air Force Airman 1st Class Spencer Stone — are high-school friends who were traveling in Europe when the incident occurred.

It's our own fault.

In the U.S., Japan, Korea and elsewhere, we use antibiotics too much. We use them to treat coughs and colds — for which they're ineffective. We've used them in animal feed in an attempt to prevent disease and to fatten cows and chickens. And the more we use antibiotics, the greater the likelihood that clever bacteria will evolve in ways that resist the attack of antibiotics. So once-treatable infections become difficult or impossible to cure.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

The Federal Reserve decided Thursday to leave interest rates unchanged at historically low levels, even though the U.S. economy has been gaining strength.

Borrowers and lenders all over the world had been closely watching for the announcement that came at the end of a two-day Fed meeting. Many had been thinking the U.S. central bank would pick this date to change course and start nudging up interest rates.

The Federal Reserve on Thursday chose to leave interest rates unchanged. For the central bank even a decision to do nothing is a big deal, creating all sorts of winners and losers.

Here's a short list of who most likely cheered the announcement and who probably turned thumbs down.

These people are applauding:

With school in full swing and flu season just around the corner, you might be looking for a way to keep those germs at bay. But if you're stocking up on antibacterial soaps, a study suggests you might as well be reaching for that regular old bar of soap instead.

It has been difficult for Hillary Clinton to seem relaxed and at ease on the campaign trail, especially as questions about her use of a private email server as secretary of state have dominated.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

This tweet from American Airlines:

Our original post is here:

American Airlines flights have been temporarily grounded across the country because of an apparent glitch in one of the carrier's computer systems.

CNBC first reported the delays.

Numerous customers tweeted complaints about delays and the airline responded:

The Syrian man who became part of an international story after he was tripped by a camerawoman in Hungary is now in Spain, where a sports organization plans to offer him work. Osama Abdul Mohsen was tripped by a camerawoman as he ran from police, holding his young son.

Arriving in Spain late Wednesday, Mohsen said, "I love you all. Thank you for all. Thank you for España."

Mohsen was part of a crowd of refugees and migrants who were trying to enter Hungary last week, when a videographer put her foot out and tripped him, sending him and his son to the turf.

Lutheran pastor Nadia Bolz-Weber admits that she does not look — or act — like a typical church leader. Heavily tattooed and with a tendency to swear like a truck driver, Bolz-Weber was once a standup comic with a big drinking problem.

But she was drawn to Lutheran theology, and when a group of friends asked her to give a eulogy for another friend who had committed suicide, Bolz-Weber discovered her calling.

Top House Republican leaders are rallying behind House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, who once again faces a percolating effort by a group of conservative lawmakers to oust him from the job.

"That's a distraction," House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., told reporters Thursday following a closed-door lawmaker meeting at the Republican National Committee. "Let's focus on what we were brought here to do."

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