Arts and Culture | WGLT

Arts and Culture

Adong Judith smiles
Mary Cullen / WGLT

Adong Judith was just a girl during the 1986 Northern Uganda War that divided her home country. This year, Judith was a keynote speaker at Illinois State University's Culturally Responsive Campus Community Conference, telling the story of realizing her blackness.

John Koch conducts
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

A venerable Bloomington-Normal choral group has spent 50 years in a town and gown endeavor that unites singers across the generations.

Ken Lam

The Illinois Symphony Orchestra begins its season Friday evening at the Bloomington Center for the Performing Arts.

Kristin Schoenback
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

Wellington the dog is dead. Cristopher Boone is on the case, and the search for the killer takes him on an adventure that leads to some surprising revelations.

Rex Parker

The letters in words you're reading right now were designed by someone, maybe a team of someones. In the digital age, designing fonts and typefaces has never been easier. Simply choosing a font for your document is as easy as clicking on a pull down menu, and among the choices will be typefaces designed by a Bloomington native.

Rhys Lovell directs Bob Kinsella and Connie Blick
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

It was the door slam heard around the world.

When Nora, the protagonist of Henrik Ibsen’s “A Doll’s House,” walked out on her husband, her children, and the sham of a life she’d been leading, the closing of the door ended the play, but opened greater opportunities for women in theater to play a rich, dynamic character.

Keith Knight
Keith Knight

Award-winning cartoonist Keith Knight's focus on racial profiling, police brutality, and race relations have many pegging him as a social activist.

Artist Grace Sheese
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

In Grace Sheese’s artwork, rabbits, squirrels and other animals frolic around ceramic cups. Yet under the whimsy, the artist has a powerful message about connection to share.

Jeff Smudde / WGLT

From medieval weapons to farming tools to hand railings and wall hangings, blacksmithing is actually thought to have started around 1,500 B.C. in the Middle East.

Walter White from Breaking Bad
AP Photo/AMC, Ursula Coyote

Pop culture once idolized the hero—the white knight who took the high road to the rescue. But lately our tastes have changed, taking a darker turn toward what we seem to find irresistible.

Tim Hunt
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

Concerts from long, long ago are more than just memories for scholar and poet Tim Hunt. 

Laverne Cox
AP

Is just being an actor enough to play the role of a gay or trans character?

Connie de veer with her book
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

The life of an actor is no easy road, with ample demands that can tax the hardiest of artists. But help is at hand from a new book from a Bloomington-Normal pair who saw the need for practical advice that leads to lasting positive change for actors.

Photo of woman in hall
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

"I just wanted to spend time with family and friends, trying to figure out what kind of relationship could happen if I put a camera between us."

Sandra Zielinski
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

Kindred spirits gather in a neighborhood bar in Philly and get something stronger than a shot of whiskey. It's a place where everybody knows your name. But do they know your heart?

Don Shandrow / Coalescence Theater Project

The Coalescence Theater Project is a new institution in the Twin Cities with some stalwart names attached.

The Illinois Governor’s Mansion is recently renovated and has re-opened for tourists, who tend to go for the historical significance. There’s also a new reason for art enthusiasts to check it out.

GLT staff and students inside our tent
Cindy Le / WGLT

GLT was a proud co-presenter for last weekend’s Sweet Corn Blues Festival in Uptown Normal, where blues and delicious corn on the cob came together for a beautiful combination.

Herb Eaton with his sculpture 'Mommy's Broom'
Pamela Eaton

Bloomington's Herb Eaton says his "Mommy's Broom" bronze sculpture chosen for this year’s Peoria Sculpture Walk is actually a vision from 30 years ago.

Large theater with chandelier hanging from curved wooden roof in a proposed dinner theater building.
The Barn III

As many as 150 people recently participated in a ceremonial barn-raising event in Goodfield, but it wasn’t to help an ailing farmer.

Creativity Center Fundraiser Faces Big Challenge

Jul 16, 2018
Front of the Creativity Center Building
City of Bloomington

For five days earlier this summer, the air conditioning system went out at the Creativity Center on Chestnut and Locust streets, across from the Bloomington Center for the Performing Arts.

Jeff Smudde / WGLT

Inside the Constitution Trail tunnel under Washington Street in Bloomington, young artist Eden Warner painted a giant letter “B” with lots of green trees.

Ryan Denham / WGLT

There will be an excess of talent on stage at this summer’s Illinois Shakespeare Festival. World-class actors performing some of the most eloquent language ever put to paper, supported by a talented army of set, costume, and lighting designers.

Opera performers
Midwest Institute of Opera

The Midwest Institute of Opera is gearing up for the 2018 season with pirates on the prowl and the love lessons of a poet.

Steampunkers
taymetayme / Flickr via Creative Commons

Cogs and Corsets: A Central Illinois Steampunk Happening is back for a second year of elaborate costuming, outrageous gadgetry and history—both real and imagined.

Child reading Harry Potter.
Seth Wenig / AP

Twenty years ago, a bespeckled young boy captured the imaginations of readers young and old, becoming a cultural force that influenced the idealism of a generation.

University Galleries Director Barry Blinderman
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

After 31 years guiding the University Galleries, the director is heading into retirement.

Laura Kennedy / WGLT

This season of the Illinois Shakespeare Festival deftly combines the thrill of both a battle and a heart won, familiar faces revisiting cherished roles, and a chance to imagine "what if" about The Bard.

Zombies
Chris Pizzello / Invision/AP

When George Romero brought "Night of the Living Dead" to the screen 50 years ago, he kicked off a trend for zombie narratives that viewers can't get enough of.

Capital Steps perform during "Orange Is The New Barack"
Capitol Steps

The Trump administration and the maturing of social media keeps The Capitol Steps on their toes as they travel from city to city.

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