Domestic Violence | WGLT

Domestic Violence

Senna Adjabeng
MCCA

An act of domestic violence occurs every 15 seconds in the U.S., translating to over 2.5 million victims a year, according to Mid Central Community Action (MCCA).

Matt Marton / AP

Chicago may impose a new surcharge on home share rentals through sites such as Airbnb and use the money to provide more beds at domestic violence shelters.

A 30-year-old Bloomington woman was stabbed to death with a butcher knife—allegedly by her husband—earlier this month. She was packing to leave what relatives say was an abusive relationship.

Mother of slain woman holding flowers surrounded by three people holding signs of support
Colleen Reynolds / WGLT

The candles flickered at a vigil at Bloomington's Franklin Park on Thursday night, just blocks from the McLean Street home where 30-year-old Nicole Elbert was killed—allegedly by her husband— as she tried to leave last week. She had planned to go to Neville House, a local domestic violence shelter.

Jae C. Hong / AP

One in three women worldwide will experience a form of physical abuse, violence experts say.

Cindy Le / WGLT

Around 100 people circled around the courthouse square in downtown Bloomington on Monday to show support for victims of domestic violence.

Woman on ISU quad with building and trees in the background
Colleen Reynolds / WGLT

“That was my choice, just get through it.”

That statement comes from Kim Wells, domestic violence and workplace safety crusader who for decades kept the secret that she too was sexually assaulted and of at all places, where she worked.

MCCA

Editors Note: During our interview series Stretched Thin, we reported on the impact of the state budget impasse on local social service agencies   That was in spring of 2016. There's still no budget. In our new series Stretched Thinner, we check back in with those social social service agencies.  

Mid Central Community Action in Bloomington is keeping its head above water as it tries to deliver services to the homeless, to those escaping and recovering from domestic violence, and to those who are trying to stabilize their lives.

Stylist using curling iron on client's hair while she sitsin salon chair
Bobbie Vie / Flickr via Creative Commons

A new law taking effect in Illinois Jan. 1 will put hair stylists on the front lines to combat domestic violence. Illinois will be the first state in the nation to require hair stylists receive training to spot if their clients might be victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.  The law does not make salon workers mandatory reporters but encourages them to direct clients to resources.

Edith Castro Roldán, Oscar Manuel Luna Nieto / Wikimedia Commons

Donald Trump declared during Sunday’s debate that remarks about sexually groping women were – as he put it – “just words” but at Illinois State University, there is a concerted effort to change the campus culture so students, faculty and staff chose their words more carefully.

Domestic Violence Advocates Seek Greater Community Action

Sep 26, 2016
McLean County YWCA

"Stand Up With Me" is the theme of a new effort in McLean County to help eradicate domestic violence.

Violence prevention groups are asking members of the community to publicly show their support for domestic violence survivors.

Creative Commons

As many as 5 million women in the United States are abused by an intimate partner each year with more than 1,500 murdered.

nomore.org

March 6 through 12 has been designated 'No More-A week of action' by a Bloomington-based national organization. 

Together with its sponsors, the Corporate Alliance to End Partner Violence seeks to end domestic violence and sexual assault through what it calls " a movement centered on a powerful new symbol that brings together all people who want to end domestic violence and sexual assault."

Illinois State University

October is Domestic Violence Awareness month. The information age has opened new possibilities of both establishing relationships with other people and abusing them. The Virtual Enemy is a new book co-authored by Shelly Clevenger of Illinois State University. It focuses on the relationships of intimate partners and cyber-crime.