GLT's Grow | WGLT

GLT's Grow

From controlling critters to whacking weeds to finding just the right plant for your plot, GLT's Grow is your source for sage gardening advice and down-to-earth tips. Host Patrick Murphy is ready to take on all your gardening questions, so submit yours today. Let GLT help your garden Grow!

Support for GLT's Grow comes from Chris Holderly at Advantage Lawn & Landscape Inc., offering personalized services for commercial and residential landscape design, installation and ongoing maintenance—with a passion for all things green. Specializing in custom patios, decking and outdoor living spaces.

Aerial view of ISU quad
Illinois State University

In some settings, trees are ubiquitous. In fact, it's hard to see the trees for the forest. But some trees earn more respect than others.

Potatoes in a bowl
Food Group / Flickr/Creative Commons

There are a lot of reasons for wasted food, the least of which is children pushing away before forking some broccoli.

Tree with oak wilt at ISU
Patrick Murphy / WGLT

If you see a tree with yellowing leaves and it’s missing branches in the center, it could be an oak in trouble.

Dogwood tree
Falon Yates / Creative Commons/Flickr

It’s not unusual for gardeners to move or transplant a shrub, tree, or plant from one location to another. But seeing that plant thrive after it’s moved is another matter.

Tree stump
Tree Stump Baumstrunk / Flickr/Creative Commons

The word “homemade” usually denotes wholesome or delicious, like homemade pie. But when it comes to homemade herbicide, pesticides, or other remedies, just as much caution is needed as with the commercially produced chemicals.

Staff / WGLT

A great-looking lawn is nice to have. But it takes a lot of time, money, and effort to maintain.

Tim Roske / AP

There are myriad pests ready to attack your vegetable garden and landscaping. And some attack in a group.

Kaarina Dillabough/Via Flickr Creative Commons

How does your garden grow? Thanks to technology you can keep tabs on your yard day and night—from anywhere in the world—on your phone.

On this week’s GLT’s Grow, Mike McCurdy talks to Patrick Murphy about outdoor weather stations and garden cameras.

Field Outdoor Spaces/FLICKR VIA CREATIVE COMMONS

Outdoor furniture isn’t what it used to be. The trend is no longer towards an outdoor dinette set but more of a living room type of space, and it can get elaborate.

Denise Krebs/FLICKR VIA CREATIVE COMMONS

All great looking landscaping has one thing in common: accurate and adequate water. During this edition of GLT's gardening program Grow, Mike McCurdy talks with ISU's Patrick Murphy about how to automate watering.

<a href="HTTPS://WWW.YOURBESTDIGS.COM/REVIEWS/THE-BEST-LAWN-MOWER/">YourBestDigs.com</a> FLICKR VIA CREATIVE COMMONS

Almost any gasoline tool can be replaced by a more environmental friendly battery-powered tool. What are you waiting for? 

Fell Hall on ISU campus
Illinois State University

The wonderful array of plantings on the Illinois State University campus can provide inspiration for new landscaping ideas in your yard.

Row of palm trees.
David Prasad / Flickr via Creative Commons

Careful landscape architecture uses spatial composition to help create good bones in your yard.

Sprinkler on lawn.
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr via Creative Commons

Water, water, everywhere. But are you getting the most out of it for your plants?

seed pod
Annelieke B / Flickr via Creative Commons

A great way to preserve genetic diversity of plants is with a seed bank.

Spring flowers
Robbie Sproule / Flickr via Creative Commons

Now that spring has finally put in an appearance, time to get out in the garden and get some things done.

Beans in collander.
Saiberiac / Flickr via Creative Commons

Don't grow just any old bean in your garden. Go with the beautiful and tasty dragon tongue bean.

Prairie verbena flowers.
Sonal Patil

Sonal in Texas has the right idea about using native plants in her yard. She's tempted to transplant the prairie verbena she sees on the roadside right into her garden. Is that a good idea?

Foxtail barley
Matt Lavin / Flickr via Creative Commons

If you want a garden that's true to its American roots and flourishes no matter what Mother Nature throws at it, then you need to add native plants to your yard.

Squash bug
Katja Schulz / Flickr via Creative Commons

Gabriele in Nine Mile Falls, Washington, has issues with two different types of bugs that have made her garden their home. But should she get rid of both varieties? Well, no.

Garden in sunshine.
Tejvan Pettinger / Flickr via Creative Commons

The pull to garden is strong, even if the flesh is ... absent. If you plan on being an absentee gardener, there's a few things you need to know to find success.

Compost bins in backyard.
Chelsea Wa / Flickr via Creative Commons

Your can turn your garden into fertile ground with the addition of compost. And what better place to create it than in your own backyard?

Freshly dug soil.
United Soyben Board / Flickr via Creative Commons

Rosa in Utica, Illinois, wants to know the best way to test her soil to get great results in her butterfly garden.

Hand holding earthworms
USDA NRCS South Dakota / Flickr via Creative Commons

Gardeners love to care for things—and that extends past plants.

Ben J. Gibbs / Flickr via Creative Commons

The more you know about your trees, the better you can care for the plant.  And it all starts with mastering some tree lingo.

Matt Lavin / Flickr via Creative Commons

Spring is on the way, bringing with it a chance to begin afresh in the garden. Now's the time to scope out seeds of flowers you've never tried before.

David Hill / Flickr via Creative Commons

Japanese Beetles are the bane of every gardener. These voracious insects are tough to get rid of, but can milky spore come to the rescue?

Gar Knight / Flickr via Creative Commons

The wind has two faces. It can be a friend or it can be a bitter foe.

Anton Vakulenko / Flickr via Creative Commons

The icy embrace of winter can be brutal, but it's a necessary part of garden life.

Coconine National Forest / Flickr via Creative Commons

There are lots of reasons why we have to cut down trees. Understanding those reasons can help us face the cruelest cut.

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