Homelessness | WGLT

Homelessness

empty hotel room
Mack Male / Flickr CC-by 2.0

Money—and in some cases, demand—is running out to give people experiencing homelessness a place to quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mark searches
Ashley Binkowski / WGLT

At 10 p.m. on a snowy Thursday in late January, Kimberly Maddox and her volunteer team bundled up and wandered the streets of Bloomington-Normal, looking for something that’s often invisible: those experiencing homelessness.

Daughter and mother pose with a social media backdrop for Night in a Car.
Colleen Reynolds / WGLT

Michael Gregg has two gym memberships. The 68-year-old has run five marathons and wearing a dark henley shirt, jeans, and fashionable black-rimmed glasses, you would never see him as homeless. But, for the past two months, Gregg’s address has been the Billy Shelper shelter at Home Sweet Home Ministries.

Housing conference in Bloomington
Eric Stock / WGLT

Editor's note: This is part of a five-story series reported at the Housing Action Illinois conference in Bloomington on Oct. 24-25. The stories ran Wednesday, Oct. 30, on WGLT's Sound Ideas.

Speakers at the conference
Breanna Grow / WGLT

Editor's note: This is part of a five-story series reported at the Housing Action Illinois conference in Bloomington on Oct. 24-25. The stories ran Wednesday, Oct. 30, on WGLT's Sound Ideas.

Last summer, Chantil was forced to leave the townhome she shared with her two daughters and her mother in Des Plaines. (We’re withholding Chantil’s last name to protect her family’s privacy.) Her landlord wanted to sell the building, and Chantil had only about a month to find a new home. Landlords, however, kept turning her down because of her credit, and her income. Chantil makes $12 an hour at a department store.