Technology | WGLT

Technology

Charley Edamala
Illinois State University

Illinois State University Chief Technology Officer Charley Edamala described it as the calm before the storm, as the extended spring break tapered down. The global pandemic has disrupted face-to-face education at most universities in the United States. Classes at ISU resume online Monday.

Cindy Hernandez

Ryan Abbott's dream of creating a mobile museum for children with autism and special needs has become a reality.

Antennae on a rooftop
Tony Weber / Creative Commons

The mayor of Normal says 5G and other smart city technology developments will be the topic for the annual One Voice leadership trip to Washington, D.C.

Megan McGowan / WGLT

In a nod to the academic and life skills that stem from student involvement, Heartland Community College will soon become the third higher education institution in Bloomington-Normal to offer a varsity esports team.

Rivian pickup and SUV
Rivian

Rivian announced Monday that its owners will be able to use Alexa voice commands to control key vehicle features—the latest collaboration between the electric automaker and Amazon.

Two women stand near a red kettle.
Eric Stock / WGLT

The Salvation Army’s bell ringer campaign is well under way, and you may notice a new addition to the red kettles.

 Raj Ramesh
Breanna Grow / WGLT

In many a popular science fiction film set sometime in the future, humans find themselves at odds with the very technology they developed.

Staff

An Illinois free speech advocate spoke in Normal on Wednesday and compared President Donald Trump's characterization of journalists as "scum" and "dirt" to tactics used by tyrannical dictators of the past. 

Central Illinois Girl Scouts are seeking new methods to recruit girls to combat a drop in enrollment.

A studio picture of Mike Romagnoli
Charlie Schlenker / WGLT

The head of the Community Health Care Clinic said six months into operations of the new dental clinic they are only scratching the surface of filling the need for tooth care for low-income people in the Twin Cities.

screen with council agenda item.
Charlie Schlenker / WGLT

The Normal Town Council voted Monday to rename Mitsubishi Motorway for Rivian, which now owns the plant along that west-side road. It was a 4-2 vote.

Rivian plant exterior
Ryan Denham / WGLT

The Bloomington-Normal driving public might have to get used to a new name for a prominent road.

photo of man at microphone
Charlie Schlenker / WGLT

The future of newspapers is in more and deeper local coverage, according to a prominent former Illinois State University student.

An Illinois State University student team was awarded a grant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for its project using recycled waste materials as an environmentally friendly alternative in construction material.

ISU plans to bring a new technology-focused incubator to Bloomington-Normal.

Kroger
Staff / WGLT

Grocery chain Kroger has another year to complete infrastructure improvements at the Bloomington site where it had previously planned to build a $25.4 million store.

Two electric scooters parked on a sidewalk
Tim Evanson / Flickr

The Town of Normal is considering an electric scooter program.

State Farm HQ building
Ralph Weisheit / WGLT

In spite of community worries over the number and average pay of State Farm employees in Bloomington-Normal, the company said the number of jobs is closing the year steady.

Rivian Automotive

Illinois lawmakers are among those stakeholders trying to figure out how to best position the state to get economic opportunities, but also how to take a common sense approach to regulation, and public safety while moving toward people sharing the road with autonomous vehicles.

State Representative Tom Demmer (R) represents the 90th district in north central Illinois. He's a co sponsor of the early legislation already made law on this topic. Demmer said the debate is not particularly partisan, but it IS complicated.

Aerial photo of Uptown Normal
McGIS

A big upgrade to McLean County’s high-tech mapping tool shows just how much can change in four years.

Andrés Vidal-Gadea
Illinois State University

An Illinois State University researcher is learning some pretty big things with help from teeny tiny worms.

AP Photo/Eric Risberg

Editor’s note: This story is part of a special episode of GLT’s Sound Ideas focused entirely on autonomous driving. It aired Nov. 21. Read more stories in the series.

Ryan testifies
YouTube / GOPFinancialServices

Editor’s note: This story is part of a special episode of GLT’s Sound Ideas focused entirely on autonomous driving. It aired Nov. 21. Read more stories in the series.

Danny Kogan

Illinois State University’s College of Business hosted its 8th annual Startup Showcase this month, with 15 student entrepreneurs competing for cash prizes to advance their business plan.

Kathy Michael speaks
Jeff Smudde / WGLT

UPDATED 3:20 p.m. | The McLean County clerk’s Facebook page has been taken down for “reconstruction” as county officials work on a new social media policy.

Drone delivery in field
Mel Evans / AP

Drones are no longer a new or emerging technology. They’re a part of everyday life for insurance companies, photographers, law enforcement, and the military.

Access to high-speed internet stops about seven miles east of both Nippersink School District 2 and Richmond-Burton Community High School District 157, according to Tom Lind. He’s the superintendent of both districts, located near the border of Wisconsin —  about 70 miles northwest of Chicago.

Rex Parker

The letters in words you're reading right now were designed by someone, maybe a team of someones. In the digital age, designing fonts and typefaces has never been easier. Simply choosing a font for your document is as easy as clicking on a pull down menu, and among the choices will be typefaces designed by a Bloomington native.

Bradon McDaniel
Eric Stock / WGLT

An Illinois State University professor is sounding an alarm that parents' overuse of technology could be leading to social and emotional problems in their young children.

Drone enthusiasts, be aware – the rules for the small, unmanned aircrafts could be changing in Illinois.

A new law bars cities from regulating the use of drones.

The law excludes the city of Chicago, but a spokesman with the Illinois Department of Transportation says it will create consistent rules around the rest of the state.

Jackie Reiser is a co-owner of Measure Illinois – a Springfield-based company that provides drones to oversee power lines and construction sites. She says more unified regulation is a good thing.

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