Technology | WGLT

Technology

Bradon McDaniel
Eric Stock / WGLT

An Illinois State University professor is sounding an alarm that parents' overuse of technology could be leading to social and emotional problems in their young children.

Drone enthusiasts, be aware – the rules for the small, unmanned aircrafts could be changing in Illinois.

A new law bars cities from regulating the use of drones.

The law excludes the city of Chicago, but a spokesman with the Illinois Department of Transportation says it will create consistent rules around the rest of the state.

Jackie Reiser is a co-owner of Measure Illinois – a Springfield-based company that provides drones to oversee power lines and construction sites. She says more unified regulation is a good thing.

Gary Smith has worked at the grain elevator at Okaw Farmer’s Co-op in Lovington, Illinois, for forty years. On his desk sit two computer screens, where he tracks corn and soybean prices online at the Chicago Board of Trade.

As he explains, trade moves fast: “Just bam bam bam, and within a few seconds it could change a nickel or a dime against your favor.”

McLean County 4-H Show
Eric Stock / WGLT

If you haven't been to the McLean County Fair's 4-H Show in a few years, you might be surprised.

Mark Huffington, Robin Casey, and Margaret Stephens mugshots
McLean County Sheriff's Department

For police and prosecutors, it’s never been easy to get witnesses to testify, especially in cases involving violent crime where retribution is a real concern.

Social media has made it even harder.

Ryan Denham / WGLT

How badly did the Community Health Care Clinic need a new website?

FBI

The FBI is honoring a Bloomington man for helping curb cybercrime.

Dania De La Hoya / WGLT

The Normal Public Library has received a $25,000 grant from the American Library Association to create a new technology mentorship program for youths in the community.

Jeff Roberson / AP

AT&T and other mobile phone providers are pushing legislation they say will ease congestion on their networks. But some towns and cities across Illinois are worried it’s really a power grab.

Baylee Steelman / WGLT

Facing cybersecurity issues on multiple fronts, local officials and IT experts briefed U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis on Thursday about what they're doing to keep pace with hackers and other online threats.

Charlie Schlenker / WGLT

The head of the Ecology Action Center said he's pleased with the weekend household hazardous waste collection event.

EDC

BN STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) is giving away thousands of glasses to classrooms across McLean County for safely viewing the upcoming solar eclipse.

Charlie Schlenker / WGLT

Online grocery deliveries are a booming industry in the U.S. and now in central Illinois.

Grocery stores have offered online shopping and delivery services for years now. But recently separate companies have begun offering the same service using the stores.

Illinois State University

State Farm Insurance is giving Illinois State University $3 million to grow the cybersecurity program. The money will create an endowed professorship in the School of Information Technology.
     
School of Information Technology Assistant Director Glen Sagers said ISU is poised to take advantage of one of the hottest areas in workforce growth.

Bloomington Police Department

Bloomington police said they want to look at a next generation body camera product because the first one under review doesn't have enough battery life.

Cameras are supposed to have eight hours of recording time. But, some batteries are lasting only three hours. Chief Brendan Heffner said the law is ambiguous because it's not clear whether ten hours refers to recording capacity or battery life.

Sergeant Clayton Arnold is overseeing the pilot project of 12 officers using body cams. Sergeant Arnold said there are procedural hurdles to clear as well, such as deciding how much time to allocate for report writing with access to body camera footage.

Staff / WGLT

District 87 Superintendent Barry Reilly calls the news absolutely deplorable that there is a web site that offers trading of nude photos purportedly of Bloomington High School students.

Charlie Schlenker / WGLT

The State Board of Elections said hackers gained access to the information of 80,000 Illinois voters, including their Social Security numbers and driver’s licenses.

Elections officials said hackers had access to Illinois’ system for nearly three weeks before they were detected. They did get access to personal information, but officials said that’s about it.

March for Science.com

Increasing public doubt of scientific findings is prompting a March for Science in Bloomington-Normal.

ISU biologist Scott Sakaluk says he and other researchers feel alarm as laypeople treat science as opinion-based and political.

Cristian Jaramillo / WGLT

The changing nature of retail is affecting cities' ability to provide basic services. As an increasing number of people discover the convenience of online shopping, cities are losing essential sales tax revenue, something internet sellers don't pay.

Bradley Gordon / Flickr

The new owner of the Gordman's Department Store Chain indicates the Gordman's in Normal will likely close.

Flickr

More than 100,000 Illinois drivers have been convicted for illegally using their cell phones in two years. The 2014 law says drivers can use cell phones only with a hands-free device.

Dave Druker is a spokesperson for the Secretary of State’s office.

Staff / WGLT

A new phenomenon on Twitter is further blurring the lines between real and fake news.  Illinois State University's School of Communication SMACC is tracking around 80 different so called "alt" or "rogue" Twitter accounts. Nate Carpenter is the assistant director of media convergence and runs the SMACC lab.  While the so-called rogue accounts may provide factual information, Carpenter said to "pay attention to the message" to judge the reliability of the Tweets.

Charlie Schlenker / WGLT

Be afraid. Be very afraid of losing your data.

If Presidential campaigns can't keep their computers secure, what hopes do the rest of us have?

Young Ladies Tea Seeks To Empower Girls

Nov 9, 2016
LaKeesha James-Smith / Empower To Create

Teaching young girls self-esteem in this social media era when self concept can easily clash with shallow notions is challenging. 

One Bloomington group is helping girls build self-worth while off technology, so they know how to interact when they are on it. GLT Correspondent Maria Henneberry talked it over with LaKeesha James-Smith with the group 'Empower To Create' about an upcoming event designed to help.

It's the third year for the 'Young Ladies Tea' which happens Saturday November 12, from 11 A.M. to 1 P.M. at the First Christian Church in Bloomington.

Charlie Schlenker / WGLT

After a year plus at the helm of State Farm Insurance, CEO Michael Tipsord took his act public in McLean County with a guided q and a at an Economic Development Council dinner. Tipsord repeated what his predecessor, now retired Chairman Ed Rust Junior said often in his closing years.

"The corporate headquarters of State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company will remain in Bloomington-Normal," said Tipsord.

Daniel Schwen / Flickr via Creative Commons

The leader of Illinois' largest utility is appealing to lawmakers’ competitive spirits to get them on board with overhauling energy regulations.

Com-Ed CEO Ann Pramaggiore says many Fortune 500 companies have committed to meeting sustainable energy goals.

WGLT

The head of the Bloomington School District is thanking State Farm Insurance for a donation of close to a thousand laptop computers.

A State Farm Insurance company gift of about a thousand laptop computers to District 87 fast tracks a number of initiatives.

Roman Boed / Flickr

The McLean County Regional Planning Commission (MCRPC) is trying to gaze into the future, with the help of area residents. The MCRPC has launched a survey asking people to answer questions while imagining conditions 30 years into the future. 

MetroNet

MetroNet has issued a new coverage map for Bloomington that includes most of the older neighborhoods previously left out as intended areas of service.

Metronet

New super-high-speed internet, phone and cable service planned for Bloomington will not extend to the residents of the city's west side -- at least not in the near future.

MetroNet, an Indiana-based service provider, had promised in April to install a fiber optic network throughout the city. 

Pages