Scott Neuman | WGLT

Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

Japan's upper house of parliament has approved unprecedented measures that clear the way for the country to deploy troops abroad for the first time since World War II, a move pushed hard by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

The ruling party faced three days of intense debate over the measures to circumvent Japan's post-war pacifist constitution, allowing its Self-Defense Forces (SDF) to operate overseas.

NPR has learned that four Russian attack aircraft have landed in Syria as part of an effort by Moscow to support the regime of Bashar al-Assad against Islamic State militants.

Pentagon Correspondent Tom Bowman says the Sukhoi jets, known by the NATO designation "Flanker" have been deployed at a forward operating base at Latakia, on the Mediterranean coast, along with four attack helicopters and four transport planes. Moscow plans to dispatch more aircraft, Tom says.

The data are in, the hypotheses have been tested and science has handed out prizes for finding answers to some of humanity's least-pressing questions: Welcome to the 2015 Ig Nobel Prizes, given annually at Harvard University to "honor achievements that make people LAUGH, and then THINK," according to Marc Abrahams, who founded the dubious tradition in 1991.

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

Taliban militiamen attacked an air force base in northwest Pakistan, killing at least 29 people, including more than a dozen attending Friday prayers at a mosque inside the military compound, but there are reports that the death toll could be higher.

More than 20 students missed a day of classes in rural Virginia after they were suspended for violating their high school's dress code that bans wearing Confederate flag emblems.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

This tweet from American Airlines:

The Federal Aviation Administration reported that computer issues were causing delays.

A spokesman for American Airlines said the carrier was working to fix the issue.

The problem follows similar computer problems at airlines in recent years.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

Army Sgt. Robert "Bowe" Bergdahl appears Thursday before a military hearing at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, to determine whether he will face a full court-martial for allegedly deserting his post in Afghanistan. The soldier was captured by Taliban militiamen and held for five years before being released last year in a prisoner swap arranged by the White House.

The Archbishop of Canterbury has called for a meeting of Anglican leaders early next year to discuss the future of the faith amid a growing split with its African churches over female priests and same-sex relationships.

In a letter to church leaders, Justin Welby also said that it is time to abandon that notion that Anglicans across the world share precisely the same vision.

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

With Hungary sealing its southern border with Serbia, thousands of migrants are turning west instead, pouring into Croatia, making the Balkan nation the latest intermediate stop for a surge of humanity trying to reach the European Union.

By Thursday morning, Croatian police said more than 6,000 people — mainly refugees fleeing the fighting in Syria — had entered that country since the first of them began arriving a day earlier.

Ringo Starr seems to be on a bit of a cleaning binge.

And that can be a chore when you own an estate in London, one in Beverly Hills and another in Monaco.

Updated at 3:35 p.m. ET

Mount Aso — a volcano on Japan's southern main island of Kyushu — has erupted, spewing black smoke and ash more than a mile into the air, the Japanese Meteorological Agency says.

So far, there have been no reports of injuries or damage, but ash fell as far as 2.5 miles from the crater.

Mount Aso, which stands 5,222 feet high, is the country's largest active volcano.

Taliban militiamen have stormed a prison in Afghanistan, freeing more than 350 inmates, nearly half of whom have been deemed especially dangerous. Four policemen were killed in the assault in the country's eastern Ghazni province.

The BBC quotes Ghazni's deputy governor, Mohammad Ali Ahmadi, as saying that one of the militants blew himself up to breach the prison gates, allowing the others to get in and force open cells.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

Here are the latest developments in the ongoing migrant crisis in Europe:

-- Lauren Frayer, reporting for NPR from Hungary's southern border with Serbia, says: "Hundreds of Hungarian police and soldiers have just moved in to make a human chain along the border. Trucks have moved in, Humvees, and they are quickly unfurling a chain-linked fence topped with barbed wire to seal off this border."

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

Kim Davis, the county clerk in Kentucky who was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, is back to work today — saying she will neither authorize such licenses nor stand in the way of her deputies if they wish to do so.

And, the first couple to apply for a license at the county clerk's office Monday — Shannon Wampler and Carmen Collins — walked out the door with one.

Texas Rep. Michael McCaul, the chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, says he's "concerned" about security for Pope Francis' visit to the U.S. next week after Washington "disrupted" one threat and continues to monitor others.

Asked about the pope's upcoming visit, McCaul, appearing on ABC's This Week, said: "I'm concerned. I was briefed by the Secret Service in a classified setting. The pope is a very — I'm Catholic, by the way — he is a very passionate man. He likes to get out with the people. And with that comes a large security risk."

Boxing champion Floyd Mayweather Jr. has fought his 49th and, he insists, final bout, remaining undefeated at age 38.

Mayweather easily outboxed Andre Berto, winning their welterweight match in a unanimous decision Saturday night at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

"My career is over. It's official," said Mayweather, who spent 17 years of his 19-year career as a world champion, according to ESPN.

Two weeks after a cease-fire that appears to have held in eastern Ukraine, Germany's foreign minister says the warring sides are "very close" to a broader agreement to remove heavy weapons from the front lines.

Frank-Walter Steinmeier, who met in Berlin with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius and their Ukrainian counterpart, Pavlo Klimkin, said the brief cease-fire had paved the way for moving toward a resolution of the crisis, set in motion by Russia's annexation of Crimea last year and its ongoing support for Ukrainian separatists.

Updated at 3:25 p.m. ET

Israeli police clashed briefly with Palestinians near the religiously sensitive al-Aqsa mosque complex in East Jerusalem, but there were no reports of arrests.

Police said they entered the site to prevent riots after they received reports that protesters planned to "disrupt visits to the area by Jewish worshipers and tourists," The Associated Press reports. The BBC says police reportedly used tear gas and flash-bang grenades as Palestinians threw rocks and fireworks.

Updated at 8 a.m. ET on Sept. 14

At least one person reportedly has been killed in an area where wildfire is raging in Northern California, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Local law enforcement is investigating the report.

Two of the fastest-burning wildfires in decades have overtaken several Northern California towns.

Updated at 4:25 p.m. ET

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

Germany's interior minister confirmed Sunday that his country would impose temporary controls on its border, halting trains between Austria and Germany for a 12-hour period to stem the flow of refugees flooding into Munich.

"The aim of these measures is to limit the current inflows to Germany and to return to orderly procedures when people enter the country," Thomas de Maiziere said at a news conference.

Cosmonaut Gennady Padalka's safe return from months aboard the International Space Station has put him in the record books for spending more time in space than any other human — the equivalent of nearly two and a half years on five different flights.

Padalka, whose latest 168-day stay on the ISS gives him a total of 879 days in space, has smashed the previous record, which was set by fellow Russian Sergei Krikalev in 2005, by two months .

Germany's southern city of Munich was expecting 10,000 migrants to arrive by train in a single day, with officials saying that 40,000 in all could arrive in the next few days.

By this morning in Munich, 3,600 had already arrived.

Chancellor Angela Merkel, facing criticism at home, said taking in asylum seekers was "the right thing to do" even as her deputy warned that the country was "reaching the limits" over how many refugees it could take.

Left-wing British MP Jeremy Corbyn has been elected in a landslide to head the country's Labour Party.

As the BBC explains:

"Mr Corbyn, who began the contest as a rank outsider, saw off a challenge from frontbenchers Andy Burnham, Yvette Cooper and Liz Kendall.

"He gained 251,417 or 59.5% of first preference votes - his nearest rival, Mr Burnham, got 19%.

"Ms Cooper was third on 17% and Ms Kendall a distant fourth with 4.5% of the vote."

Egypt's Prime Minister Ibrahim Mehleb has stepped down along with his cabinet, apparently bowing to pressure from a corruption probe that saw the arrest of his agriculture minister last week.

President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi accepted Mehleb's resignation.

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

A pair of explosions at a restaurant in the state of Madhya Pradesh, that have apparently been traced to gas cylinders, killed more than 60 people, officials say. Some reports say the death toll is at least 89. Dozens of others were injured.

NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. On Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you four items.

From NPR Washington Desk correspondent Brian Naylor:

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake — who battled criticism over her handling of riots earlier this year in the wake of the death in police custody of Freddie Gray — said Friday that she will not seek re-election in 2016.

Democrat Rawlings-Blake, 45, made the announcement during a morning news conference, citing her desire to concentrate on rebuilding efforts in the city in the wake of the April riots.

Two Tea Party Republican lawmakers in Michigan are gone today — one resigned, another expelled — after their alleged extramarital affair and a botched cover-up became national news last month.

Michigan state Rep. Todd Courser announced his resignation at 3:12 a.m. today after hours of debate in the state Legislature over whether to force him out of the body.

A hand-picked council that spent months writing a new constitution for Thailand has rejected its own final draft, which would have allowed the government extraordinary emergency powers. But the move ensures more months of delay that will keep in power the military junta that seized power in a coup last year.

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