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$10.8 million.

That’s how much people in Illinois spent on marijuana during the first five days of legal recreational pot sales in the state. It’s one of the strongest spending showings in the country among states to legalize.

But the demand sent pot dispensaries into a bit of frenzy — causing some to shut their doors or limit purchases because they were running out of weed.

A medical condition that often escapes public notice may be involved in 20% of deaths worldwide, according to a new study.

The disease is sepsis — sometimes called blood poisoning. It arises when the body overreacts to an infection. Blood vessels throughout the body become leaky, triggering multiple-organ failure.

Sometimes you have to strike when the iron is hot, and sometimes you have to be patient. For today's guest Jeremy Ivey, that meant recording his first solo album at the age of 41.

Cybercrime is booming, and victims are often at a loss about where to get help.

In theory, Americans should report the crimes to the FBI, via its Internet Crime Complaint Center. In practice, the feds get hundreds of thousands of complaints a year, and have to focus on the biggest cases.

But the other option, calling the police, can seem even less promising.

Since 2017, the Trump administration has placed layers of tough sanctions on Iran in an effort to deprive the regime of financial resources and to force it to negotiate a new nuclear deal.

Illinois lawmakers last year moved to crack down on acts of violence committed in a place of worship. The legislation, signed by Governor JB Pritzker, asks judges to increase the penalty for murder and assault in a church or against someone engaged in religious practice.

As Bradley University Political Science Professor Craig Curtis explains to WCBU, the measure comes at a time when lawmakers are moving away from mandating harsher criminal punishments — and does little to  protect congregations.


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Officials at Springfield’s Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, known as the ALPLM, are once again trying to verify the authenticity of a hat once thought to belong to Lincoln.

Some wolf puppies are unexpectedly willing to play fetch, according to scientists who saw young wolves retrieve a ball thrown by a stranger and bring it back at that person's urging.

This behavior wouldn't be surprising in a dog. But wolves are thought to be less responsive to human cues because they haven't gone through thousands of years of domestication.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

Ukraine's national police are investigating whether U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch was under surveillance in Kyiv last spring — something implied in a series of WhatsApp messages between a little-known Republican political candidate and an associate of Rudy Giuliani, President Trump's personal lawyer.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

A federal watchdog concluded that President Trump broke the law when he froze assistance funds for Ukraine last year, according to a report unveiled on Thursday.

The White House has said that it believed Trump was acting within his legal authority.

Lt. Governor Juliana Stratton's office leads the state’s Justice, Equity and Opportunity Initiative. She joined The 21st show to discuss the state's efforts to bring more people of color into the cannabis industry, reinvest in struggling communities and help people with criminal records for low-level cannabis offenses get their records cleared.

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Oh, man. This week "Jeopardy!" crowned its greatest contestant of all time.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "JEOPARDY!")

ALEX TREBEK: Ken Jennings...

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Congrats, Ken. That's the best...

TREBEK: ...You are the champion.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

President Trump on Thursday defended students who feel they can't pray in their schools — and warned school administrators they risk losing federal funds if they violate their students' rights to religious expression.

Trump held an event in the Oval Office with a group of Christian, Jewish and Muslim students and teachers to commemorate National Religious Freedom Day. The students and teachers said they have been discriminated against for practicing their religion at school.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

A volcano that has thrown a blanket of ash over much of the Philippines' main island of Luzon in recent days is somewhat quieter, but tremors continued and authorities warned people that a deadly new eruption was still possible.

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So back in 1984, Bruce Springsteen had a rather urgent problem.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M ON FIRE")

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: (Singing) Oh, oh, oh, I'm on fire.

Back in 2016, as she campaigned for Hillary Clinton, Laura Hubka could feel her county converting.

"People were chasing me out the door, slamming the door in my face, calling Hillary names," Hubka recalled.

Hubka is the chair of the Democratic Party in Howard County, Iowa. It's a tiny county of just about 9,000 people on the Minnesota border, and it's mostly white, rural and, locals say, religious.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

Amid much pomp and circumstance, the Senate took some of its first steps on Thursday to prepare for next week's impeachment trial of President Trump, just the third such trial in Senate history.

Chief Justice John Roberts, having crossed First Street from the Supreme Court building over to the Capitol, joined senators in the chamber and then was sworn in by Senate President pro tempore Chuck Grassley of Iowa. Roberts will preside over the trial.

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President Trump, quote, "knew exactly what was going on." That's according to Lev Parnas. He's the Soviet-born businessman who was working with Rudy Giuliani to dig up information in Ukraine that would help President Trump in the upcoming election.

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Two weeks ago, the gyms were crowded, the to-do lists were long, and the resolutions were still going strong.

But it's easy to let those new intentions slide — especially if lifting the TV remote counts as exercise.

Have you had a New Year's resolution that only lasted a few days? Tell us about it in a couplet — a short and sweet poem with two lines that rhyme. Here's an example from Kwame Alexander, NPR's poet-in-residence.

To the flower box I forgot to water, the dinner rolls I swore I wouldn't eat;

In early December at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, two anxious scientists were about to send 20 years of research into orbit.

"I feel like our heart and soul is going up in that thing," Dr. Emily Germain-Lee told her husband, Dr. Se-Jin Lee, as they waited arm-in-arm for a SpaceX rocket to launch.

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