Camille Phillips | WGLT

Camille Phillips

Camille Phillips covers education for Texas Public Radio.

She previously worked at St. Louis Public Radio, where she reported on the racial unrest in Ferguson, the impact of the opioid crisis and, most recently, education.

Camille was part of the news team that won a national Edward R. Murrow and a Peabody Award for One Year in Ferguson, a multi-media reporting project. She also won a regional Murrow for contributing to St. Louis Public Radio’s continuing coverage on the winter floods of 2016.

Her work has aired on NPR’s "Morning Edition" and national newscasts, as well as public radio stations in Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska.

Camille grew up in southwest Missouri and moved to New York City after college. She taught middle school Spanish in the Bronx before beginning her journalism career.

She has an undergraduate degree from Truman State University and a master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

They are early risers and hard workers. They have a "talent for struggling through" and the determination that follows. Some are the first in their family to go to college — or even graduate from high school — and many are financially independent from their parents. They're often struggling to pay for rent, groceries and transportation while taking classes. And that means working while in school — in retail, on campus or even with a lawn care business.

A new father trying to provide for his family. A grandmother finishing what she started more than four decades ago. A man navigating multiple schools, hidden curriculums and financial hurdles. These are just some of the older students working toward a degree in the U.S.

Texas' Board of Education voted Friday to change the way its students learn about the Civil War. Beginning in the 2019-2020 school year, students will be taught that slavery played a "central role" in the war.

The state's previous social studies standards listed three causes for the Civil War: sectionalism, states' rights and slavery, in that order. In September, the board's Democrats proposed listing slavery as the only cause.