Steve Inskeep | WGLT

Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is a host of NPR's Morning Edition, as well as NPR's morning news podcast Up First.

Known for interviews with presidents and Congressional leaders, Inskeep has a passion for stories of the less famous: Pennsylvania truck drivers, Kentucky coal miners, U.S.-Mexico border detainees, Yemeni refugees, California firefighters, American soldiers.

Since joining Morning Edition in 2004, Inskeep has hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, Cairo, and Beijing; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "The Price of African Oil," on conflict in Nigeria. He has taken listeners on a 2,428-mile journey along the U.S.-Mexico border, and 2,700 miles across North Africa. He is a repeat visitor to Iran and has covered wars in Syria and Yemen.

Inskeep says Morning Edition works to "slow down the news," making sense of fast-moving events. A prime example came during the 2008 Presidential campaign, when Inskeep and NPR's Michele Norris conducted "The York Project," groundbreaking conversations about race, which received an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence.

Inskeep was hired by NPR in 1996. His first full-time assignment was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush. After the Sept. 11 attacks, he covered the war in Afghanistan, turmoil in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid gone wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of NPR News teams awarded the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for coverage of Iraq.

On days of bad news, Inskeep is inspired by the Langston Hughes book, Laughing to Keep From Crying. Of hosting Morning Edition during the 2008 financial crisis and Great Recession, he told Nuvo magazine when "the whole world seemed to be falling apart, it was especially important for me ... to be amused, even if I had to be cynically amused, about the things that were going wrong. Laughter is a sign that you're not defeated."

Inskeep is the author of Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi, a 2011 book on one of the world's great megacities. He is also author of Jacksonland, a history of President Andrew Jackson's long-running conflict with John Ross, a Cherokee chief who resisted the removal of Indians from the eastern United States in the 1830s.

He has been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, NBC's Meet the Press, MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports, CNN's Inside Politics and the PBS Newshour. He has written for publications including The New York Times, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and The Atlantic.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

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Are enough Americans following national guidelines to reduce the spread of the coronavirus?

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Well, Deborah Birx, a key member of the White House pandemic task force, says no.

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How much farther can Americans go in order to help contain the pandemic?

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How many Americans are infected with the coronavirus?

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We find out today what investors think of the latest effort to stabilize the economy.

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New cases of the coronavirus are emerging around the country.

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Although the result was never in doubt, you could feel the weight of history as senators cast their votes yesterday.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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How much longer could a Senate impeachment trial go? And who might show up to testify?

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We have a good idea of what John Bolton would say if the Senate agreed to hear him at President Trump's trial.

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Here's the story behind a Christmas present. That's what a North Korean official threatened to deliver to the U.S. in the coming days.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HAPPY HOLIDAY")

ANDY WILLIAMS: (Singing) Happy holiday.

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing) Happy holiday.

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Former national security adviser John Bolton has kept a low profile since President Trump fired him back in September. Now he is emerging in an interview on NPR.

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As the impeachment inquiry against President Trump has unfolded, one name in particular has surfaced over and over again in both private hearing transcripts and public testimony: the president's personal lawyer, Rudolph Giuliani.

Congressional testimony has placed Giuliani at the center of the Ukraine affair, with multiple witnesses telling House investigators that he helped spearhead an irregular diplomatic channel between the U.S. and Ukraine.

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Quote, "This is not a happy day." That is what reporters heard from House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel last night as he signaled plans by fellow Democrats to unveil articles of impeachment against President Trump.

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Here is the starting point for Rachel Rojas of the FBI in Pensacola, Florida.

RACHEL ROJAS: We are, as we do in most active shooter investigations - work with the presumption that this was an act of terrorism.

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Iraq's prime minister says he will resign. The announcement follows a deadly day in Iraq, with security forces killing dozens of protesters in multiple incidents. This, of course, comes after months of protests in the country.

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Faced with congressional subpoenas, the White House cannot just say no.

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Does the evidence show President Trump abused his power? We start to hear for ourselves this week witnesses testify publicly in the House impeachment inquiry, and we prepare this morning by examining the evidence so far.

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STEVE INSKEEP, BYLINE: We have messages this morning from Americans imprisoned in Iran. At least five U.S. citizens are in Iranian custody. Some are allowed to call home, and we've been learning some of what they say. For one of those prisoners, a grim anniversary passed just this month.

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U.S. forces in Syria complicated any effort by Turkey to invade for years. Now that U.S. forces are going, U.S. sanctions are not immediately having the same effect.

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The United States is pulling its forces out of northern Syria. And the Syrian government is moving back in.

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Federal prosecutors say two businessmen had a motive for making illegal contributions to U.S. political campaigns. The two men sought to remove an American diplomat in Ukraine, according to an indictment unsealed on Thursday.

The two men, Igor Fruman and Lev Parnas, were associates of President Trump's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani. They also have business interests in Ukraine.

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How far can President Trump go in defying the will of Congress?

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