Tiffani Jackson | WGLT

Tiffani Jackson

Tiffani Jackson is a reporting intern at WGLT and a student at Illinois State University's School of Communication. She started working at WGLT in summer 2019.

Ways to Connect

Olivia Butts
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

A leader with the local Black Lives Matter chapter is urging the Bloomington City Council to allow cannabis sales as a form of reparations for the drug war’s injustices against people of color.

Jacob and Justin
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

The music industry is highly competitive. Those who have talent can get overlooked.

Jacob Hoffman, founder of Basement Bars Records, says he can change that.

Marquell, recipient, and Carla
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

Amid continuing police-involved shootings of black Americans and renewed focus on racism at Illinois State University, two local groups have teamed up to show solidarity—and make 50 kids very, very happy.

Megan McGowan/WGLT

“After you get your life taken away for a little while, the way you value it if given a second chance becomes a passion.”

Kyana and Bridgetta
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

Race and healthcare have a dark history together.

The 1932 Tuskegee Syphilis experiment is perhaps the most infamous example, when over 100 innocent black men were infected with the disease and died from its effects.

Jamel and Willie
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

Scholarship recipients from Central Illinois on Friday will hear from a leader of color who embodies the type of success that the NAACP’s Freedom Fund Banquet wants to cultivate.

Linda Foster
Tiffani Jackson

When Linda Foster moved to Bloomington-Normal in 1977, she noticed a lack of equal opportunity for minorities. Raised in a family of visionaries and problem solvers, Foster followed the same path and made bringing change a priority by joining the NAACP.

Dortch walks in
Jalen Golden / Courtesy

Thomas Dortch Jr., a community activist and national chairman of the 100 Black Men of America organization, brought his call for unity to Bloomington as he made a guest appearance at the local chapter’s 10th annual excellence gala.

Mary, Erick, and Karen
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

Erick Howard was only 12 when his mother realized he had an eye for precision.

Kid getting a haircut
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

In the wake of mass shootings across the country, a fear to leave home and resume daily tasks has impacted many families.

Gloria Hursey
Courtesy

After nearly three decades of fulfilling her calling, residential services director Gloria Hursey said her goodbyes to the Bloomington Housing Authority last week as she officially retired.

Kids pose with certificates
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

When Alicia Lenard heard about an award ceremony for minority students in Bloomington-Normal, she made sure her fifth-grader, Christina, was there.

YouthBuild members Amarion Cleveland and Megan McClure
Courtesy / YouthBuild McLean County

When Megan McClure and Amarion Cleveland attended public school, they felt the environment didn’t support their goals. Feeling out of place and overlooked, they decided to take an alternative route to success and found safe haven ‒ plus a trip of a lifetime to Washington D.C. ‒ through a program known for shaping future leaders: YouthBuild McLean County.

Dollar Tree sign
Eric Stock / WGLT

Julie Catey of Broadwell loves shopping at the Dollar Tree store in neighboring Lincoln.

Andrew Held
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

Andrew Held decided to devote his life to youth outreach after witnessing two troubling incidents in Bloomington during 2011.

Stop the Violence Project truck
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

We’ve all heard that it takes a village to raise a child. Still, there’s another African proverb about community: The child who is not embraced by the village will burn it down to feel its warmth.

Tameka and Goldrick
Courtesy

Every week or so on GLT's The Leadoff podcast, we'll bring you the story of an unsung community servant who's making Bloomington-Normal a better place. It's a feature we call More of That, Please. Subscribe to The Leadoff on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. You can also suggest local people we should feature.

Alyssa and Brandon
Tiffani Jackson / WGLT

It’s been said that the success of future generations depends on the choices people make today, both individually and collectively. Two teachers chose to use their platforms to change lives this summer by bringing the legacy of the New Jersey “Lights On” program to Bloomington High School.