Bloomington Liquor Commission | WGLT

Bloomington Liquor Commission

Hooters exterior
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The Bloomington Liquor Commission approved three new liquor licenses Tuesday, including a tavern license for a restaurant going into the former Hooters location on Hershey Road.

Squad car with lights flashing blocking entrance to the 500 block of north Center in downtown Bloomington.
Colleen Reynolds / WGLT

It's been six months since the city of Bloomington came up with a plan to address safety concerns for bar patrons and police officers trying to handle as many as 1,600 people pouring into the streets on busy weekends.  The solution appears to be having the desired effect but so far, it comes with a price tag of $80,000 because police officers used for the additional downtown detail are considered "hire backs," and not part of the regular schedule, therefore they are paid time-and-a-half.

Staff / WGLT

Bloomington Mayor Tari Renner has named two new members of the Liquor Commission.

They are Realtor Jack Bataoel and Lindsay Powell, who works in Marketing at Growmark.

Feldkamp Not Backing Down From Liquor Commission

Sep 27, 2016
Michael Hill / WGLT

Bloomington Liquor Commission Member Sue Feldkamp addressed the city council Monday night in an effort to encourage a five-member commission over a one-member commission and to refuse to resign from her post. Feldkamp said she was told she could serve as long as she wanted.

Michael Hill / WGLT

Bloomington Aldermen will consider changes to ordinances on smoking and the liquor commission tonight. The city council will vote on a ban on electronic cigarette vaping in city-owned facilities where smoking is banned.

Michael Hill / WGLT

In a 5-4 vote, the Bloomington City Council approved liquor license fee increases for the first time since 1982. The changes will begin next year, with subsequent increases in 2019 and 2021. The original proposal called for additional fees to be spread out over three years. Alderman Mboka Mwilambwe said the compromise will help businesses work out the details over a longer period of time.

Paul Sableman / Creative Commons

Bloomington could begin bringing in more money for alcohol regulation and late night downtown policing as well as police and fire department pensions.