Amy Held | WGLT

Amy Held

Amy Held is an editor on the newscast unit. She regularly reports breaking news on air and online.

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

A day after flames leaped through Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris sparking fears the beloved building could be consumed, Parisians sang and prayed in processions through the streets and held vigils Tuesday evening close to the church constructed more than eight centuries ago.

The cathedral stood blackened with much of its roof gone, its spire collapsed and charred rubble inside, but it remained standing, its main structure and two towers spared.

A New Jersey woman pleaded guilty Monday to theft by deception for perpetrating what began as a story of redemption that was revealed to be a ruse.

Katelyn McClure appeared in New Jersey Superior Court, admitting to her role in duping thousands of people out of $400,000 through a fictionalized GoFundMe page purporting to benefit a homeless veteran said to have bought her gas.

Updated on Tuesday at 5:25 a.m. ET

Notre Dame Cathedral, one of the world's most famous churches, erupted in flames Monday in Paris, losing its spire but remaining otherwise largely intact after firefighters worked through the night to contain the fire.

Buoyed by Thursday's ouster of longtime President Omar al-Bashir, Sudanese protesters faced off against troops during a sit-in outside military headquarters in Khartoum on Monday as they amplify their call for civilian-led rule.

Tattooing goes back millennia and spans cultures, as evidenced by mummified remains, yet many details of the body modification's origins have been shrouded in mystery. Now an ancient bone tattoo kit from the Pacific island nation of Tonga is providing researchers with more than an inkling into the rich history of Polynesian body art, a method so indelible, little has changed in some 3,000 years.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

In his latest salvo against unfair trade practices in a major Asian market, President Trump says he plans to end preferential trade treatment for India, which sought to downplay the significance of the move.

As President Trump headed home dealless from Vietnam following his aborted summit with Kim Jong Un, North Korean officials held an impromptu middle-of-the-night news conference at a Hanoi hotel, offering an account about the failed talks that differed from Trump's.

City workers in Germany have seized a family's pedigreed pet pug and sold the animal on eBay to cover the debts of its owners, including an unpaid dog tax.

Frank Merschhaus, spokesman for the city of Ahlen, told NPR in an email that the seizure of "the valuable pet" was "legally permissible" because of open claims by the city's treasury office.

Sometimes the lowly sewer rat is the target of shrieks, kicks and extermination attempts. And sometimes yesterday's vermin becomes today's vaunted victim, inspiring a phalanx of rescuers to come to its aid.

At least that is what happened over the weekend in Germany, where a firefighter-cum-corpulent-critter rescue crew worked to free the animal in a pinch with a manhole cover.

President Trump and Kim Jong Un provided upbeat optics at the launch of their second summit in Hanoi on Wednesday. With cameras flashing, the leaders strode before the international press corps at the luxurious Metropole Hotel, grasped hands and posed with American and North Korean flags as a backdrop.

The summit continues Thursday, when the two sides are expected to get into the nitty gritty of an agreement.

Updated at 7:52 p.m. Eastern

After 36 hours languishing aboard a stalled train that hit a tree in a rural snow-covered area outside Eugene, Ore., ecstatic passengers pulled into the city before noon on Tuesday met by food stations and a throng of media attention.

After stepping off at the station in Eugene, passenger Emilie Wyrick told NPR she was thrilled to be "just moving" her legs.

Carly Bigby got a croissant provided by the American Red Cross. "I am anxious to get a solid meal and a shower and maybe some coffee," she told NPR.

A woman who had returned to Scotland after vacationing in Australia didn't know she had hauled home a serpentine stowaway, until she reached into her suitcase to unpack and encountered a snake coiled within a shoe, according to her family.

The Scottish SPCA, an animal welfare charity, confirmed to NPR in an email that one of its rescue officers recovered the snake at a property in Bridge of Allan, a town located about 30 miles northeast of Glasgow.

Nearly six months after a cartoon mocking Serena Williams unleashed immediate international rebuke, with critics calling it a racist Jim-Crow-era-like rendering of the sports star, the Australian Press Council weighed in on Monday, defending the image.

Seated in a Riverside County, Calif., courtroom on Friday, David Turpin, 57, and Louise Turpin, 50, pleaded guilty to 14 counts related to crimes against 12 of their children, in a case that captured worldwide attention for its levels of depravity.

Each parent pleaded guilty to one count of torture, four counts of false imprisonment, six counts of cruelty to an adult dependent and three counts of willful child cruelty, according to Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin.

Botswana, home to the world's largest elephant population, is moving toward culling the numbers of the giant mammals by lifting a wildlife hunting ban, after a group of Cabinet ministers endorsed the move.

Human rights violations and abuses that have grown routine against civilians and children in the world's youngest country, may constitute war crimes, according to a new report by the U.N.'s Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan outlining acts of brutality committed in 2018.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Beleaguered USA Gymnastics has named a new president and CEO — its fourth in two years — as the sport's governing body battles criticism that it ignored and even enabled widespread sex abuse by former team doctor Larry Nassar.

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

At 2:21 p.m. on Feb. 14, 2018, the first gunshots began to reverberate through the hallways of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, leaving 14 students and three educators dead; 17 others were wounded.

One year later at 10:17 a.m., silence descended on Florida's schools.

A truck bomb attack on a bus carrying members of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, killed 27 Guards and wounded 13 others in the southeastern Sistan and Baluchistan Province on Wednesday, according to Iranian media reports.

In a grim rite, officers from across the New York City Police Department stood and saluted Tuesday night under a cold drizzle outside Jamaica Hospital Medical Center as the remains of a detective, believed to have been caught in the crosshairs of fellow law enforcement, were driven past in an ambulance.

A dozen people who helped lead Catalonia's failed secession bid more than a year ago entered the Supreme Court in Madrid on Tuesday to face charges including rebellion, criminal organization and the misappropriation of public funds — holding Spain in the grips of a highly politicized televised trial.

They saw an opportunity and they seized it, set it up, then scaled it.

Some enterprising chimpanzees at the Belfast Zoo in Northern Ireland's capital, propped a tree branch against the wall of their enclosure Saturday to make an improvised, yet sturdy, ladder.

A prominent Bahraini soccer player, who had been facing a decade behind bars in his home country on disputed arson charges, was released from a Bangkok prison Monday after extradition charges against him were dropped.

Hakeem al-Araibi, 25, who had been living as a refugee in Australia with permanent resident status, will return there, the country's prime minister, Scott Morrison, said.

As high-level and high-stakes U.S.-China trade talks get underway in Beijing this week, global markets are responding positively, with Asian stocks closing mostly higher on Monday.

The Shanghai Composite Index rose 1.36 percent to close at 2,653. Hong Kong's Hang Seng gained 0.6 percent to close at 28,123. And Taiwan's TSEC 50 Index grew 0.72 percent to 10,004. Australia's ASX lost 0.12 percent to close at 6,128.

Luxury brand Gucci has removed a sweater from store shelves and from its web site following complaints about the garment's resemblance to blackface.

The black sweater, featuring a roll-up collar that covers the lower face with a wide red lip outline around the mouth, was part of Gucci's Fall Winter 2018 line.

A vast system that brought snow and cold to normally milder cities including San Francisco, Seattle, Salt Lake City and even Las Vegas was moving eastward into the central part of the country on Wednesday. The country's midsection from New Mexico to Michigan was blanketed in frozen precipitation. The system caused treacherous travel, shuttered schools and even closed ski resorts.

A panicked leopard ran through the streets of Jalandhar in northern India on Thursday as residents thronged and scattered, if not to help catch the big cat then to capture a cellphone image of the jarring scene.

Video shared on social media shows residents swarming as the leopard darts down alleyways and up over walls. At one point, a man perched atop a barrier attempts to catch the leopard in a net; instead, the animal charges at the man, knocking him off the wall before continuing on its way.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

U.S. Customs and Border Protection says its agents seized a record amount of fentanyl Saturday from a produce truck attempting to enter the country from Mexico at Arizona's Port of Nogales crossing.

Updated Jan. 18 at 11:02 a.m. ET.

At least 21 people were killed and dozens injured in a car bomb blast at a police academy in Colombia's capital, Bogotá, on Thursday morning, according to officials, who called it a terrorist act.

Columbia's defense minister blamed the attack on a leftist rebel group called the National Liberation Army, or ELN, which has carried out occasional attacks in the country. The bombing has stoked anxiety about a return to the decades when innocent Colombians got caught up in conflicts with rebel groups and drug cartels.

It turned out to be the little sprout that couldn't.

The vaunted cotton seeds that on Tuesday China said had defied the odds to sprout on the moon — albeit inside a controlled environment — have died.

China's state-run Xinhua News Agency announced the news, simply stating: "The experiment has ended."

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