Teri Schultz | WGLT

Teri Schultz

Most international travel destinations are off-limits to Americans at the moment because of the United States' high rate of coronavirus infections and its own restrictions on incoming visitors. Ireland, however, has decided to let Americans in.

Even so, U.S. travelers heading to Ireland may not get the traditional Irish greeting of a "hundred-thousand welcomes." There's a perception that Americans are resistant to wearing masks and are refusing to follow Ireland's rule to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The games some people have been playing on social media — choosing who they'd want to be quarantined with — have become real life in Belgium.

Under strict lockdown since March 16, including home confinement except for essential journeys, Belgium's controls have been some of the tightest in Europe. But it's worked — after hitting one of the highest death rates in the world, the nation's infection rate and death toll have dropped steadily since a peak in early April.

With restaurants closed in Belgium until at least June 8 due to the country's COVID-19 lockdown, piles of potatoes that would have been deep-fried and topped with a glop of mayo have nowhere to go.

Some 750,000 tons of spuds intended for the free market that remain unsold — and those under contract but unable to be processed due to the glut — will only remain edible until the end of June. Meanwhile, the price for such potatoes has plummeted.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: