Sustainability | WGLT

Sustainability

International Documentary on Climate Change Educates B-N

Jul 3, 2019
istart2.blogspot.com

Internationally-known documentary maker and environmentalist Renee Scheltema said "Normal is Over."

District 87 sign outside Bloomington Junior High School.
Eric Stock / WGLT

District 87's sustainability efforts are getting national attention.

Ryan Denham / WGLT

There are signs of trouble for a new grocery store cooperative in Bloomington.

Invenergy

The Zoning Board of Appeals has given its OK to a wind farm in northeastern McLean County.

Staff / WGLT

Recycling isn't getting any easier. More items can be recycled now, like batteries and electronics. Packaging has gotten more complex, as well, according to Michael Brown with the Ecology Action Center (EAC).

Michael Brown / Ecology Action Center

The Ecology Action Center (EAC) is moving forward with its 2017 Household Hazardous Waste Collection event after meeting an early fundraising goal.

When Steph Davidson and Jennifer Swartout heard talk that the local food trend in Bloomington-Normal had maxed out, they decided to take action.

Prairerth Farm

A farmer and an extension agent agree there are a number of issues hurting small organic farmers in Illinois and one of them is that a growing number of people don't know how to cook. 

A retired Illinois State University political scientist thinks the next Stevenson Lecturer and Adlai E. Stevenson himself would have agreed on many issues.

Michael Brown / Ecology Action Center

The energy economy is changing in a way that there may be no way to save coal and coal jobs as President Trump has pledged.  

Ecology Action Center

McLean County's future solid waste plan could include provisions that would divert up to 74 percent of items and materials being landfilled today. 

Staff / WGLT

Wind Farm rules gusted back into the McLean County Board room yesterday.

The county has strengthened environmental protections before allowing new wind tower projects to go forward. But, debate over the so-called text amendment to special use permit requirements also covered noise, rural quality of life, and the cost to remove wind towers.

Lauren Barker / Fix It Friday

One way to save money is to save things you own, like clothing.

"Fix It Friday," which is scheduled for Oct. 7 in Uptown Normal, is a cooperative effort at Illinois State University between Fashion Design and Merchandising students and the Office of Sustainability.

Facebook

Epiphany Farms Hospitality Group is reaching goals in year 7 of its 10 year business plan. During  an on-location edition of Sound Ideas at Epiphany on Main, co-owner, founder, chef and farmer Stu Hummel said there was never any question of failure when the farm to fork enterprise was started.

Jim Browne / WGLT

An Illinois State University Professor of Economics does not support a move by the McLean County Board last week that prevented a change to the wind farm siting ordinance, sending the proposal back to the Zoning Board of Appeals for review.

Research from Illinois State University's Department of Economics is being used to support legislation increasing the statewide requirement for renewable energy sources, called the Renewable Portfolio Standard or RPS.

Kelly's Bakery And Cafe Hosts Local Flavors Event

Jul 20, 2016
Woman cutting tomato
Colleen Reynolds / WGLT

The Local Flavors farm-to-table restaurant series continues tomorrow at Kelly’s Bakery and Café where the menu will feature roasted chicken salad on a pretzel roll, a roasted veggie pita, applesauce and sweet peach tea, all made with ingredients from Central Illinois farms.  Owner Kelly Mathy says farms who supply her use practices associated with organic farming but ingredients are not certified as organic.

Stangboy7 / Wikimedia Commons

A proposed change to rules for siting wind farms in McLean County didn't get very far.

Board member Catherine Metsker took aim at the County Zoning Department for failing to notify townships and cities of the potential change.

Chef shows off stuffed tomatoes
Colleen Reynolds / WGLT

The local foods movement has come a long way in a short time with a bigger network of suppliers, making it easier for restaurants to source food within a 100-mile radius.  Now in its ninth year, a local flavors farm-to-fork series kicks off this month at The Garlic Press,  an Uptown Normal restaurant that was on the forefront of keeping it local.

Jackie Brunell-Lanier‎ / Farm To Food Pantry Facebook Page

Bloomington is one of 50 mid-sized communities across the nation to receive a $60,000 health planning grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The planning will help bring together stakeholders over the next 18 months to address health concerns -- specifically as it concerns geography and what the grant materials call "built environments."

Workbench/Green Top Grocery

Bloomington-Normal's start-up food co-op Green Top Grocery has set a construction timeline.

Expect to see earth-moving equipment on the site at 921 E. Washington Street in Bloomington beginning in July. General Manager Michael Pennington says most of the work then will be installing underground utilities with the bulk of construction occurring late in the year.

Ground Breaking For 'Active' Community Garden

May 20, 2016
Colleen Connelly

The Twin Cities is about to get a new community fruit and vegetable garden.

Groundbreaking for the West Bloomington Active Garden on Illinois Street will take place Saturday. Colleen Connelly, one of the project's coordinators, says the garden will serve as a learning tool for children and youth.

Illinois State University

The Millennial generation is having an effect on the planning for the Town of Normal's next comprehensive plan which would guide the town  for the next 20 years.  Millennials are currently the largest generation in the United States. In the Town of Normal, Millennials age 18-34 make up more than 50% of the population.

Equinox House Models Rainwater Collection

Apr 18, 2016
Michael Hill / WGLT

An increasing number of people are seeking ways to better conserve water and decrease water contamination. Ty Newell is a retired engineering professor from the University of Illinois.

He's been working to make his home in Urbana a model of conservation and energy efficiency by collecting rain water for use in a range of household purposes. Newell recently gave a tour of his home to WGLT's Michael Hill.

Ralph Weisheit

Solar electric power generation, an energy option which could reduce greenhouse gases and combat climate change, is facing some serious hurdles in Illinois.

During a Sound Ideas climate change panel discussion at the Illinois Sustainable Living and Wellness Expo, the five guests agreed that Illinois has more than enough sunshine to produce ample solar power, that solar power would create jobs, and lower utility prices.

Staff

Michael Keane says he viewed wind power as a "science experiment" when he was working his way up the corporate ladder following his graduation in accounting from Illinois State University in 1977.

Some twenty-five years later, he found himself as an executive at  Clipper Windpower, a firm that was one of the first to produce wind turbines so ubiquitous today.

Workbench/Green Top Grocery

The organizers of what would be the community’s first co-op grocery story, Green Top Grocery, has to raise a total of $600,000 by February 29th. The organization still has about $450,000 to go. During GLT's Sound Ideas, Green Top Grocery Board Chair Melanie Shellito told Mike McCurdy, owner loans are continuing to come in at a steady pace.

The Land Connection

A central Illinois farmer is this year's Sustainable Agriculture Award winner in Illinois. Harold Wilken farms more than 2,000 acres near Danforth in Iroquois County.

Leonard G. / Wikimedia Commons

Negotiators at  the U.N. climate change conference in Paris have reached a rough blueprint for reining in emissions and reducing global warming. Many issues remain and those will need to be resolved by the summit’s end on Friday. WGLT's Mike McCurdy talked with two Illinois volunteers with the Citizens' Climate Lobby about their plan to address global climate change.

New Rules On Old Tires

Oct 12, 2015

The Illinois Pollution Control Board has issued new rules about how to handle used tires. State officials say the rules will apply to operators of tire disposal and storage sites and facilities that retread, stamp and die-cut tires. The rules are meant to protect from tire fires and breeding of disease-carrying mosquitoes from standing water in tires. The rules will require operators to change the way they store used tires both indoors and outdoors. The rules also will give emergency responders easier access to tire piles in case there's a fire or other emergency.

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