Jason Rosenbaum | WGLT

Jason Rosenbaum

Since entering the world of professional journalism in 2006, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in Richmond Heights with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. They have two sons, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum and Declan Todd Rosenbaum.

Just two months ago, Missouri voters approved a constitutional amendment to change how the state draws legislative boundaries. The state's lawmakers, who return to session this week, aren't having it and may seek to nix or rewrite the anti-gerrymandering law.

Missouri was one of four states where voters last year decided to make significant changes to the redistricting process in the name of curbing partisanship and reducing political influence on legislative and congressional maps.

President Donald Trump speaks
Evan Vucci / AP

The trade partnership struck between the Trump administration and the EU this week is a “big deal” for Illinois farmers, U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis said Thursday during a visit with the president near St. Louis.

Eric Greitens had barely been Missouri's governor for a week when he faced a pretty tough decision: cutting the Show Me State's budget.

Following the protests over Michael Brown's shooting death in Ferguson, Mo., last year, aggressive ticketing in St. Louis County's towns and cities elicited national scrutiny. That practice also caught the attention of the Missouri General Assembly, which clamped down on ticket-happy policing.

But the new law is having some unintended consequences. And some of St. Louis County's municipal leaders are fighting back.