NPR from Illinois State University
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Sound Ideas

  • Normal Council member Karyn Smith says allegations against the city manager aren't about ethics, they're about gender bias. Six council members chastise the seventh, Stan Nord. Plus, the insurance industry workforce is about to become scarce. A lot of retirements coming up in the next few years. District 87 teachers say a pr campaign to score political points by protesting black history curriculum is way off base. And McLean County's legal community and housing advocates have a new plan lessen a spike in evictions once the statewide moratorium goes away in August.
  • Normal Council member Karyn Smith says allegations against the city manager aren't about ethics, they're about gender bias. Six council members chastise the seventh, Stan Nord. Plus, the insurance industry workforce is about to become scarce. A lot of retirements coming up in the next few years. District 87 teachers say a pr campaign to score political points by protesting black history curriculum is way off base. And McLean County's legal community and housing advocates have a new plan lessen a spike in evictions once the statewide moratorium goes away in August.
  • A group that represents State Farm and other insurance companies is warning of a “retirement cliff” over the next 15 years that will leave over 400,000 open positions unfilled industrywide.
  • Six members of the Normal Town Council excoriated the seventh, Stan Nord, for what some called bullying and others slander of City Manager Pam Reece.
  • The pandemic may have eased in Bloomington Normal but a lot of residents are still frantic about the danger to family members in India. Listen to south Asian community concerns about what's still a global problem. Plus the retiring head of the Center for Human Services in Bloomington says need for mental health services in the community outpaces supply by more than two to one. A week long series of activities marking Juneteenth begins. And legislators and advocates hope to make Illinois the second state to permit marriage certificate name changes for trans people.
  • The pandemic may have eased in Bloomington Normal but a lot of residents are still frantic about the danger to family members in India. Listen to south Asian community concerns about what's still a global problem. Plus the retiring head of the Center for Human Services in Bloomington says need for mental health services in the community outpaces supply by more than two to one. A week long series of activities marking Juneteenth begins. And legislators and advocates hope to make Illinois the second state to permit marriage certificate name changes for trans people.
  • Five years into implementation of the county mental health action plan, the head of the McLean County Center for Human Services in Bloomington said community leaders are trying to identify the next priorities.
  • COVID-19 caseloads, hospitalizations, and deaths have steadily dropped recently in the United States. As Illinois moves into a full economic reopening, it's easy for some to act like the pandemic is over. But in India, a major crisis rages on. Bloomington-Normal's Indian community wants others to pay attention.
  • It took McLean County six months to get to 40% of the population fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Health officials say they're optimistic the rate will climb through the summer and fall, even as the number of residents getting doses dwindles.
  • The pace of vaccinations has slowed dramatically in McLean County and the health department may soon end mass clinics. It's still a long road from the current 40 percent inoculation rate in McLean County to herd immunity at 70 or 80 percent. Plus, it's garlic season in central Illinois. Learn about the ancient nutritious, even antiseptic herb and how to save your taste buds and tummy from the smelly thing. The identities of creative people can never truly be separated from the things they create, but Black artists often find themselves pigeonholed by White curators. Go behind a Bloomington Normal exhibition highlighting Black freedom of creative expression.