Arts and Culture | WGLT

Arts and Culture

Actors in the musical
Beetlejuice The Musical / Facebook

Say "Beetlejuice" three times fast and you’ll summon the irreverent demon—and Savannah Wetzel will make sure he’s nattily attired.

Students sit in classroom and talk.
Ryan Denham / WGLT

When a community is struggling with a social issue, theatre can be a place to explore it. Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” tackled the obsession with success the American Dream instills in Willy Loman. Joseph Stein’s “Fiddler on the Roof” shows the power of community tradition as a glue that can keep people together in tough times.

Ryan smiles and stands in front of a wall.
Sean Newgent

The popularity of Minecraft, mobile games, and Fortnite has proven that gamers are everywhere. The CEO of Netflix told investors at the beginning of the year that the platform faces more competition from Fortnite than HBO. The industry as a whole made around $135 billion last year alone. Gamers are everywhere.

Mary Cullen / WGLT

Most historical artifacts get tucked away in museums behind locked doors and thick glass. For some, the best piece of history fits in your palm and sits in a drawer at home.

Putting the Cross in Cross-Pollination Painting
Angel Ambrose

The 10th annual “What’s So Good About Good Friday?” art show spotlights local artists’ impressions about Good Friday and their Christian faith. This year more than 60 artists will exhibit works centering on the idea that Jesus’s crucifixion, death, and resurrection accomplished something beautiful.

German Wheel
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

Gamma Phi Circus at Illinois State University celebrates a milestone anniversary this weekend with a show that looks back over the decades, even as the circus moves confidently towards a bright future. 

Nahm and Quinlan
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

You can forget about that Peeps-toting bunny. The rabbit to watch this season is one you can’t even see. Or can you? 

Judy Garland
AP

Back during the Golden Era of Hollywood, one year flashed with a brilliance that earned it the title, "The Greatest Year in Hollywood History."

Performer and educator Paige Hernandez said she created the multi-cultural/multi-generational show Liner Notes to bridge generational gaps while preserving the culture of hip-hop.

Native American with placcard.
Kenn Little

Kenn Little takes aim at misrepresentation of Native Americans in the new documentary, “More Than a Word.”

Rami Malek wins award
Richard Shotwell / Invision/AP

What's an Oscar telecast without a little drama? Or even a lot of drama, courtesy of controversy and the ever obliging social media. 

Ed Harris
Richard Shotwell and Invision/AP

Artificial intelligence scares the heck out of some people. Others are excited about the rise of the new technology.

Jay Maidment / Disney

Remake is a word with power in Hollywood. 

A glance at what’s playing at your local multiplex shows that everything old is new again as Hollywood’s close, personal relationship with remakes is stronger than ever. Audiences line up to see remakes and reboots of treasured favorites, like “Mary Poppins,” “Batman” and “Ocean’s Eleven.” Even recent failures like “Ben Hur” and “Tarzan” haven’t dampened the film industry’s lust for remakes.

Ron Frazier
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

Fine art photographer Ron Frazier had hit rock bottom with his inspiration. After photographing the Illinois landscape for many years, he felt his enthusiasm waning until, finally, he put down his camera.

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Basim Magdy
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

The films of Basim Magdy depict curious and unlikely narratives through images wrapped in original sound. His unique storytelling is captured in the latest exhibition at University Galleries in Uptown Normal. “To Hypnotize Them With Forgetfulness” is currently up through Dec. 16. 

classic car
Kuhnml / Flickr/Creative Commons

Editor’s note: This story is part of a special episode of GLT’s Sound Ideas focused entirely on autonomous driving. It aired Nov. 21. Read more stories in the series.

Child creating art
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

A new grant to the Children's Discovery Museum has allowed it to throw open the doors to let the kids go out and about to find new artistic experiences and spark a little creativity.

Adong Judith smiles
Mary Cullen / WGLT

Adong Judith was just a girl during the 1986 Northern Uganda War that divided her home country. This year, Judith was a keynote speaker at Illinois State University's Culturally Responsive Campus Community Conference, telling the story of realizing her blackness.

John Koch conducts
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

A venerable Bloomington-Normal choral group has spent 50 years in a town and gown endeavor that unites singers across the generations.

Ken Lam in action
Ken Lam

The Illinois Symphony Orchestra begins its season Friday evening at the Bloomington Center for the Performing Arts.

Kristin Schoenback
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

Wellington the dog is dead. Cristopher Boone is on the case, and the search for the killer takes him on an adventure that leads to some surprising revelations.

Rex Parker

The letters in words you're reading right now were designed by someone, maybe a team of someones. In the digital age, designing fonts and typefaces has never been easier. Simply choosing a font for your document is as easy as clicking on a pull down menu, and among the choices will be typefaces designed by a Bloomington native.

Rhys Lovell directs Bob Kinsella and Connie Blick
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

It was the door slam heard around the world.

When Nora, the protagonist of Henrik Ibsen’s “A Doll’s House,” walked out on her husband, her children, and the sham of a life she’d been leading, the closing of the door ended the play, but opened greater opportunities for women in theater to play a rich, dynamic character.

Keith Knight
Keith Knight

Award-winning cartoonist Keith Knight's focus on racial profiling, police brutality, and race relations have many pegging him as a social activist.

Artist Grace Sheese
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

In Grace Sheese’s artwork, rabbits, squirrels and other animals frolic around ceramic cups. Yet under the whimsy, the artist has a powerful message about connection to share.

Jeff Smudde / WGLT

From medieval weapons to farming tools to hand railings and wall hangings, blacksmithing is actually thought to have started around 1,500 B.C. in the Middle East.

Walter White from Breaking Bad
AP Photo/AMC, Ursula Coyote

Pop culture once idolized the hero—the white knight who took the high road to the rescue. But lately our tastes have changed, taking a darker turn toward what we seem to find irresistible.

Tim Hunt
Laura Kennedy / WGLT

Concerts from long, long ago are more than just memories for scholar and poet Tim Hunt. 

Laverne Cox
AP

Is just being an actor enough to play the role of a gay or trans character?

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