McHistory | WGLT

McHistory

Though a city in the free north, southern-state settled McLean County was not a welcome environment for members of the anti-slave movement.

Workers with dog
McLean County Museum of History

At the tail end of the Civil War, there was another battle stirring in the City of Bloomington: the war on dogs.

Rev. Ernest Norquist
McLean County Museum of History

Amidst the civil rights movement, one Bloomington clergyman traveled south of the Mason-Dixon line to register blacks to vote.

Lue Anna Brown Sanders Clark
McLean County Museum of History

In the era of Jim Crow laws, enforced racial segregation kept blacks and whites separate at restaurants, in bathrooms, and in education.

Two men in formal wear with one holding a plaque.
Colleen Reynolds / WGLT

Former Bloomington Mayor Jesse Smart joked as he received the McLean County History Museum's History Makers Award, "We all at some time in our life hope that at our funeral somebody will have something nice to say.  So, I appreciate the fact that I am here tonight ."[to hear nice comments.]

Each year the McLean County Museum of History Board selects the History Makers who are recognized for outstanding, lifelong contributions of time and talents that have helped make McLean County a better place to live.

This year's History Makers include:

McLean County Museum Of History

Today's Connect Transit bus system can trace its roots in Bloomington-Normal back more than 130 years. 

A new form of transportation connected Bloomington residents in the late 1800's, a horse railway.

McLean County Museum of History

We always like to hear stories of lovable rogues, the scalawags who cannot help but be loved despite their moral gray areas.

Here is one such story.

McLean County Museum of History

As many social service agencies in the state suffer from lack of state funding today, we hearken back to an era when such services came only from the local community.

GLT's Charlie Schlenker produced this edition of the occasional series McHistory done in partnership with the McLean County Museum of History.

Emma Shores / WGLT

The McLean County Museum of History is offering a dramatic look at voices from the past in its cemetery walk over two weekends.

The walk attracts as many as 3,700 people annually. Most are school children attending weekday performances.

McLean County Museum of History

There's a lot of talk this year about the anger of Americans who used to be middle class, those who feel insecure about their future and their society. Today we revive GLT's occasional series McHistory, with a look at a time in Bloomington Normal people were a lot more fearful and angry than they are now. It was the Great Depression and people who were accused of being socialists really were.