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Join us for an expert panel discussion, moderated by the GLT newsroom, about youth mental health at 6 p.m. Feb. 12 at ISU's Alumni Center.

Brandt Industries
Jeff Smudde / WGLT

Brandt: Help Wanted But Skilled Labor In Short Supply

Brandt Industries is adding more jobs at its new agriculture manufacturing plant north of Normal, but a manager there said hiring has been slowed by the challenge of finding qualified workers.

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Music Stories

Sunday Afternoon, from left: Logan Berg, Jacob Labertew, Austin Willis, Nick Saathoff, DiMari Fennell
Sunday Afternoon

Members of the Bloomington-Normal neo-eclectic band Sunday Afternoon said winning a couple Battle of the Bands confirmed their retro sound was finding an audience.

Cindy Youngren and Dan Diefendorf with Hoosier Daddy at Crusens in Peoria
TJ Dehn

Members of three established Peoria-based bands have come together as the Americana trio Hoosier Daddy.

C.J. Chenier
Karen Murphy / Chicago Blues News

CJ Chenier is known as “The Crown Prince of Zydeco.” But the son of the man known as “The King of Zydeco” said the music he plays isn’t technically zydeco.

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Ashoor Rasho has spent more than half of his life alone in a prison cell—22 to 24 hours a day. The cell was so narrow he could reach his arms out and touch both walls at once.

“It was pretty broke down, the whole system, the way they treated us,” says the 43-year-old Rasho, who has several mental health conditions.


Connect Transit
Staff / WGLT

Connect Transit riders could soon be paying higher fares to take the bus.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

Among those federal workers, FBI agents. The FBI Agents Association says without funding, that important counterterrorism, drug and child abuse investigations are stalled.

Thomas O'Connor is president of the association, which advocates for more than 14,000 former and active FBI special agents. And he joins me now. Mr. O'Connor, welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

For three days last week, thousands of Guatemalans blocked roads and major highways to protest the Central American country's slide toward a constitutional crisis. The protest organizers included groups that have long demanded justice: indigenous communities and campesinos, as rural and farm workers are called.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

Among those federal workers, FBI agents. The FBI Agents Association says without funding, that important counterterrorism, drug and child abuse investigations are stalled.

Thomas O'Connor is president of the association, which advocates for more than 14,000 former and active FBI special agents. And he joins me now. Mr. O'Connor, welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

Among those federal workers, FBI agents. The FBI Agents Association says without funding, that important counterterrorism, drug and child abuse investigations are stalled.

Thomas O'Connor is president of the association, which advocates for more than 14,000 former and active FBI special agents. And he joins me now. Mr. O'Connor, welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

Among those federal workers, FBI agents. The FBI Agents Association says without funding, that important counterterrorism, drug and child abuse investigations are stalled.

Thomas O'Connor is president of the association, which advocates for more than 14,000 former and active FBI special agents. And he joins me now. Mr. O'Connor, welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

It's a meeting of two truly American pastimes: football and lawsuits.

First, the football.

Late in regulation in Sunday's NFC championship game, the New Orleans Saints were tied 20-20 with the Los Angeles Rams in pursuit of the Super Bowl.

~~~~~https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2FForTheWin%2Fstatus%2F1087126552184184832~~~~~~

As the ball sailed toward Saints receiver Tommylee Lewis, Rams cornerback Nickell Robey-Coleman knocked into Lewis, appearing to make helmet-to-helmet contact. Officials called no pass interference or helmet-to-helmet penalties.

The Trump administration is planning to ask the Supreme Court to review a lower court's ruling that blocks the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census, according to a Justice Department filing released Tuesday.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

As the partial government shutdown hits a record 32nd day, the Senate is set to consider two competing proposals this week that could reopen the government — but probably won't.

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